Detected malicious verification code

Not trying to hide secrets, and got the 'Detected malicious verification code' error
Detected malicious verification code when verifying element – ever run into this scenario while authoring?

 

 

Detected malicious verification code when verifying element – ever run into this scenario while authoring?

 

Watch your copy/paste’s

In my example, adding Rules, Datasources, and WriteActions (including tasks).  I was copying and pasting DataSources (DS) and WriteActions (WA), thought I had it all.  Uploaded > got the error, and GRR!   Hopefully this will help others authoring to know what to check to get the management pack uploaded.

 

Simply put – Watch out for typo’s!

I stumbled across a few sites, but nothing really pointed out to what caused the ‘detected malicious verification code’ when uploading a management pack.  First, check monitor and rules to verify the DS/WA are called correctly (no errors in file names.  Check the Tasks as well as DisplayStrings, to make sure everything matches.

 

Error Seen when uploading Management pack from SCOM Console GUI

<ManagementPackNameHere> Reports could not be imported.

 

If any management packs in the Import list are dependent on this management

pack, the installation of the dependent management packs will fail.

 

Verification failed with 1 errors:

——————————————————-

Error 1:

Found error in

2|<ManagementPackNameHere>|1.0.0.6|<ManagementPackNameHere>|

| with message:

Detected malicious verification code when verifying element of type

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Configuration.ManagementPackRule with inner

exception: System.Collections.Generic.KeyNotFoundException: The given key

was not present in the dictionary.

at System.ThrowHelper.ThrowKeyNotFoundException()

at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.get_Item(TKey key)

at

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Configuration.ManagementPackRule.VerifyDataTy

pes(Dictionary`2 moduletypes)

at

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Configuration.ManagementPackRule.Verify(Verif

icationContext context)

at

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Configuration.Verification.VerificationEngine

.VerifyCollectionItems(Object context)


 

Additional links

Detected malicious verification code when verifying element

Forum https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/ac50ae14-882a-4788-a8e4-6a975c498a29/detected-malicious-verification-code-when-verifying-element-of-type

Caution using Tags/Notes extending classes

Caution
Caution

 

Please take ‘caution using Tags/Notes extending classes’.  Please read below if you use Tags/Notes on SCOM classes.  Ran across examples where SCOM Class Properties were used for tags that used the .Notes field on various classes, causing orphaned properties, NOT removed from OperationsManager database.

 

 

Background

The Microsoft.Windows.Computer Class (insert class here) is updated using Tim McFadden’s blog.  This can cause issues with orphaned classes in the database because it is not currently handled as part of the stored procedure (i.e. the Notes property classes do not get marked for deletion).

 

First, identify which classes have Notes property.  Start from Management Server (MS) via PowerShell.   See attached TXT for additional examples to check and add/remove Notes Property on additional windows classes.

 

 

Set Notes property for Windows Operating System server

Second, we need to see how to set and clear the value, in order to clean up the Operations Manager database, to remove the orphaned instances.  The example below sets the value for one (1) server to ‘Production’.

 

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = “Production”

$WOS.Overwrite()

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

 

 

Example Output

PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = “Production”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.Overwrite()
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

PropertyAccessRights : Unknown
Parent : Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Standard
Type : Notes
Value : Production
Id : 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
ManagementGroup : SCOM2016
ManagementGroupId : e39f5f53-9fbb-9d7f-4bfe-5f0324630ae5

 

 

Set Notes property to NULL

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = $null
$WOS.Overwrite()

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”

Verify Notes value

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

 

 

Example Output
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

PropertyAccessRights : Unknown
Parent : Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Standard
Type : Notes
Value : (null)
Id : 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
ManagementGroup : SCOM2016
ManagementGroupId : e39f5f53-9fbb-9d7f-4bfe-5f0324630ae5

 

Have a happy Holiday!

Good luck, hopefully this scenario isn’t something that impacted the monitoring environment!

ConfigMgr SMS role alerts

Microsoft Endpoint Configuration Manager
Microsoft Endpoint Configuration Manager

It’s that time to figure out the ConfigMgr SMS role alerts – If you are monitoring your SCCM/MECM environment, then you get role failure alerts.  Many times, the Operations Helpdesk, NOSC, NOC, SOC, etc. will get alerts when various roles fail on the Configuration Manager platform.  The common ask is why, what do you see, etc.  Much like Exchange, ConfigMgr internalizes the checks that are seen in the console as registry keys or events documenting said degraded component/feature.  Helping the MECM administrator understand the failure is key to decoding how to notify administrator, and when the helpdesk needs to act on ‘ConfigMgr SMS role alerts’.

 

Example – MECM/SCCM looks at replication probe action state $Config/RoleName$

Example MECM Service Monitor for role alerts
Example MECM Service Monitor for role alerts

 

The role check is based on a variable of the RoleName in a registry key that the application updates.

 

MECM Monitor Config
MECM Monitor Config

 

This is the origin of ConfigMgr SMS role alerts

HKLM:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SMS\Operations Management\SMS Server Role\$Config/RoleName$\Availability State

 

Decoder ring:

1 is critical state

2,3,4 are warning states

 

If more details are needed, download SCCM/MECM Management Pack for SCOM here

Use Tyson’s SCOM Helper pack to unseal, and inspect XML.

 

Once you know the origin of the ConfigMgr SMS role alerts, you can begin tuning the MECM alerts to your environment.  Understanding role alerts will help both teams understand MECM application health.  First, use MECM application health to trend alerts/outages.  Second, leverage maintenance mode schedules, or MM scripts to NOT monitor for common administration tasks.  From my experience, the alerts are the result of MECM Admins maintaining the application – common actions like building application/package lists, cleanup actions, site maintenance, backups, etc.  Lastly, set up a subscription to notify after the tuning discussion.  See my blog on building a subscription for more details.

WebConsole APM hotfix for SCOM2012R2 and above

Vaccination Record - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
Vaccination Record

SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above, time for another SCOM shot!  Don’t forget your vaccination card 🙂

 

Let’s get started.  Time to fix the vulnerability for ‘SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above’.  Read the support article, and assess what versions you have in your sandbox and production.  Once assessed, it’s time to test/implement/verify the fix applied.

 

Support article

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/topic/update-for-idor-vulnerability-in-system-center-operations-manager-kb5006871-0e3a513a-ad80-4830-8984-2fc5a40ee7f7

 

 

SCOM WebConsole Hotfix links

(support.microsoft.com articles)

Specific support article for SCOM2019 UR3 Hotfix

SCOM2019 UR3 Hotfix support.microsoft.com article link

Specific support article for SCOM2016 UR10 Hotfix

SCOM2016 UR10 Hotfix support.microsoft.com article link

Specific support article for SCOM2012R2 UR14 Hotfix

SCOM2016 UR10 Hotfix support.microsoft.com article link

 

# Download (same EXE has all 3 SCOM versions)

https://download.microsoft.com/download/3/e/e/3eec1274-64d5-4285-84b9-c50800eb2dd2/KB5006871.EXE

 

 

Hotfix updates two paths on SCOM management server with the WebConsole role

Paths updated

(don’t forget to add File Version property to your display)

NOTE Drive letter depends on where you installed SCOM (typically D:)

 

SCOM2019 paths

D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center\Operations Manager\WebConsole\AppDiagnostics\Web\bin

D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center\Operations Manager\WebConsole\AppDiagnostics\AppAdvisor\Web\Bin

SCOM2016 paths

D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager\WebConsole\AppDiagnostics\Web\bin

D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager\WebConsole\AppDiagnostics\AppAdvisor\Web\Bin

 

Screenshot of paths

AppDiagnostics File Path - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
AppDiagnostics File Path
AppDiagnostics AppAdvisor File Path - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
AppDiagnostics AppAdvisor File Path

 

Just in case you forgot how to add properties in Windows Explorer…

In the columns (Name, Date modified, etc,) right click > More

Add file property - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
Add file property

Hit F to move down to the F named details > hit check box for ‘File Version’ or click on File Version and hit space bar

Click on OK

Add file property File Version - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
Add file property File Version

 

Sort by ‘Date Modified’ Column

Verify File Version - SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above
Verify File Version

 

File versions AFTER installing hotfix

Depending on which SCOM version you’re running, the path stays pretty much the same, and you want to verify that files were updated for the ‘SCOM hotfix released for WebConsole/APM’

SCOM2019

UR3 = 10.19.10505.0 > Hotfix file version = 10.19.10550.0

SCOM2016

UR10 = 7.2.12324 > Hotfix file version = 7.2.12335.0

Standard UR10 files are 8.0.10918.0

 

Voila > SCOM hotfix complete

Notify your Security team you’ve patched, because sometimes the scanner software isn’t accurately updated (where Security needs to open a case with their vendor!)

 

Complete:  Patched environment for ‘SCOM WebConsole/APM on SCOM2012R2 and above’

Parse Events via PowerShell into table

Parsing Events via PowerShell into table
Optometrist eye testing equipment picture

 

Parse Events via PowerShell into table.  Ever have need to parse an event, and grab a field from the event description, then perform some action after that?

 

Here’s some PowerShell that may help you first to create a table, then setup columns, gather data, then parse what you need, and run a command to then output to the table

 

# Create Table for alerts

$Table = @()

$Table = $null

 

$Table = New-Object System.Data.DataTable “Failed Hosts List”

$Col1 = New-Object System.Data.DataColumn Host

$Col2 = New-Object System.Data.DataColumn IPAddress

$Table.Columns.Add($Col1)

$Table.Columns.Add($Col2)

 

 

$Alert20046 = Get-WinEvent -FilterHashtable @{LogName=’Operations Manager’;

ID=’20046′;}

 

$Alerts20046 = $Alert20046.Message

$Alerts20046.count

 

$Alerts20046uniq = $Alerts20046 | sort -uniq

$Alerts20046uniq.count

 

# $DeniedUniq = $Denied20046 | Sort-Object -Uniq

# $ServersDenied = @()

 

foreach ( $server in $DeniedUniq)

{

$Name = nslookup $server

foreach ($server in $Name)

{

# Add to Table   

# $Name.Split(“:”)[6]

# $Name.Split(“:”)[8]

$row = $Table.NewRow()

$row.Host = $Name.Split(“:”)[6]

$row.IPAddress = $Name.Split(“:”)[8]

$Table.Rows.Add($row)

}

}

 

Mining Windows Event Log

Mining Ore from the Windows Event Log and finding a way to make it portable

 

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer, to mine an event, including examples for a specific string, from a specific event, in a specific event log?

 

 

Hopefully this post will help with a few tips to simplify monitoring for events, whether in AzMon, SCOM, or via PowerShell.

 

 

Let’s start with the Dr Scripto blog post from quite a while ago –

https://devblogs.microsoft.com/scripting/data-mine-the-windows-event-log-by-using-powershell-and-xml/

 

Not sure how many people use get-WinEvent, but this is one tool in PowerShell that can help an admin parse the XML side of an event.

 

Example 1

Query Application Event Log for Severity, Event, and Event Data contains lync.exe

$query = @”

<QueryList>

  <Query Id=”0″ Path=”Application”>

    <Select Path=”Application”>*[System[Provider[@Name=’Application Hang’]

    and (Level=2) and (EventID=1002)]]

    and *[EventData[Data=’lync.exe’]]</Select>

  </Query>

</QueryList>

“@

Get-WinEvent -FilterXml $query

 

PowerShell output

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer
Lync.exe event example output

 

 

 

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer

The Tip or Trick part of this – leverage your Event Viewer Filter as a query to use with get-WinEvent

Credit for this tip comes from Andrew Blumhardt!

See below for examples to ‘use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer’

 

Navigating via Event Viewer:

Hop onto your favorite server, or connect to another server via Event Viewer

Go to the Event Log > Click Filter Current Log

Build out your filter (i.e. choose specific Event Sources, exclude events, include severities, timeframe (start/end), etc.)

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer
SCVMM Application Log Event ID 25933

Switch to the XML tab (and note you can edit your query further!)

SCVMM query example screenshot
Event Viewer filter XML tab

You can copy the query from the Event Viewer into your Get-WinEvent syntax

$query = @”

<QueryList>
<Query Id=”0″ Path=”Application”>
<Select Path=”Application”>*[System[Provider[@Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2012.Monitor.UserRoleQuotaUsageMonitor’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2012.Report.ServiceUsageCollection’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2012.Report.VMUsageCollection’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2016.EnableCredSSPClient’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2016.Monitor.UserRoleQuotaUsageMonitor’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2016.Report.ServiceUsageCollection’ or @Name=’Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager.2016.Report.VMUsageCollection’] and (Level=2 or Level=3) and (EventID=25933)]]</Select>
</Query>
</QueryList>

“@

Get-WinEvent -FilterXml $query

 

PowerShell output

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer
SCVMM query example screenshot

 

 

 

 

Example 3

Grab System Event Log, Event ID 5827  (NetLogon denied events)

get-WinEvent -FilterHashtable @{LogName=’System’; ID=’5827′;}

 

PowerShell output

Use Get-WinEvent to use XML and filters from event viewer
get-WinEvent filter by logname and event ID

 

 

Documentation:

Get-WinEvent https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/microsoft.powershell.diagnostics/get-winevent?view=powershell-7.1

MSFT DevBlogs https://devblogs.microsoft.com/scripting/data-mine-the-windows-event-log-by-using-powershell-and-xml/

Which subscription was the trigger?

Hello Again,

Surprise!

I am back, as a rusty nail, and back to make lemonade from lemons!

Rusty Nail through Lemon

Rusty Nail through Lemon

 

Ever run into an email you don’t want to get, but have difficulty finding

the subscription entry?

 

Do you get a subscription Email, and that channel has the Notification ID, but you’re not sure what subscription sent the alert email?

 

Let’s start with the notification email

Example

Notification subscription ID generating this message:

{AA0C1081-D04F-F5CA-DEB7-92B9ECA619E2}

 

On SCOM MS > Open PowerShell

Get-SCOMNotificationSubscription

 

Example

PS C:\windows\system32> Get-SCOMNotificationSubscription -ID

“BD52BB72-3FDE-9D7F-6214-B9A47A311896”

 

Configuration     :

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Administration.AlertChangedSubscriptionConfiguration

ManagementGroup   : SCOMTestLab

Name              : Subscription168e29fd_a8e5_4ee4_956f_d9591b845475

DisplayName       : AD DailyTasks Report

Description       : +CRITERIA = Alert Name Contains ‘Proactive DailyTasks AD

Team Report’     +RESOLUTIONSTATE = (0)

New    +SUBSCRIBERS = AD team, USER Kevin Justin via EMAIL     +CHANNEL = SMTP Email

Actions           : {SMTPAction_a6a5314d_83f5_47c0_910a_e60040b4c808}

ToRecipients      : {USER <blank> via EMAIL, USER <blank> via EMAIL, USER

<blank> via Email, USER <blank> via EMAIL…}

CcRecipients      : {}

BccRecipients     : {}

Enabled           : True

Id                : bd52bb72-3fde-9d7f-6214-b9a47a311896

ManagementGroupId : 001b9265-3c9f-816c-aa36-a8687c05be8e

 

Get-SCOMNotificationSubscription | ? { $_.ID -eq

“BD52BB72-3FDE-9D7F-6214-B9A47A311896” }

 

Example

PS C:\windows\system32> Get-SCOMNotificationSubscription | ? { $_.ID -eq “BD52BB72-3FDE-9D7F-6214-B9A47A311896” }

Configuration     :

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Administration.AlertChangedSubscriptionConfiguration

ManagementGroup   : SCOMTestLab

Name              : Subscription168e29fd_a8e5_4ee4_956f_d9591b845475

DisplayName       : AD DailyTasks Report

Description       : +CRITERIA = Alert Name Contains ‘Proactive DailyTasks AD

Team Report’     +RESOLUTIONSTATE = (0)

New    +SUBSCRIBERS = AD team, USER Kevin Justin via EMAIL     +CHANNEL = SMTP Email

Actions           : {SMTPAction_a6a5314d_83f5_47c0_910a_e60040b4c808}

ToRecipients      : {USER <blank> via EMAIL, USER <blank> via EMAIL, USER

<blank> via Email, USER <blank> via EMAIL…}CcRecipients      : {}

BccRecipients     : {}

Enabled           : True

Id                : bd52bb72-3fde-9d7f-6214-b9a47a311896

ManagementGroupId : 001b9265-3c9f-816c-aa36-a8687c05be8e

 

Update the subscription

Depending on the subscription criteria, you may need to adjust the classes, or rules/monitors, or even the criteria (properties)

 

Example

Using Subscription Description for more details into what is filtered, who alert is delivered to, and the channel used

SubscriptionDescription

 

Example

Expanding Subscription Criteria to see details into what criteria is filtered for subscription

SubscriptionCriteria

SubscriptionCriteria

See previous blogs for the best practice / how to set up subscriptions to show useful data without all the clicks

Subscription set up guide

Docs article How to Create Notification Subscriptions | Microsoft Docs

SCOM 2016 web console hot fix released

Burglar stealing a monitor
Security hotfix for SCOM 2016 web console released before your information is stolen

SCOM 2016 web console hot fix

Security teams may be contacting you for CVE-2020-1331 vulnerability on the 2016 web console.  In my example, the Tenable scanner listed ALL SCOM management group servers – under SCOM2016/2019).

NOTE KB does not install on server, so does not show up under ‘Installed Updates’

 

 

Background

HotFix DLL comes with a readme to replace the DLL for the SCOM 2016 WebConsole role

If you don’t already know this, the roles each get their own directory on your SCOM server

Security scanners run scripts to help validate if system is vulnerable.  It is possible that the scanner is just looking for some string for the install of SCOM, NOT the actual role that is vulnerable.

 

SCOM 2016 typically installs @ (‘\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016’)

SCOM 2019 typically installs @ (‘\Program Files\Microsoft System Center’)

 

 

Identify SCOM roles

Open PowerShell window to identify roles

cd “D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager”

 

 

Resolve Web Console vulnerability

High level steps

Download the KB here

Execute KB

Copy dll and readme file

Backup DLL and replace

Reboot server

Contact Security Team to re-scan server

 

Mitigate vulnerability

Download the KB here

Extract downloaded the KB

Click Run to extract, and list extraction path

Click Run for Security Warning pop-up
Click Run for Security Warning pop-up

Copy Windows Explorer Path you want to extract to, and paste in the path

Example

S:\MonAdmin\MSDN images\SCOM\2016\WebConsole HotFix

Enter path to extract Hot Fix
Extract Hot Fix

 

Copy current DLL & replace with hotfix DLL

Open PowerShell window (as admin)

# Backup DLL

# Change Drive letter if you hopefully installed SCOM on D: drive (non-system drive)

copy “C:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager\WebConsole\MonitoringView\bin\Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.OperationsManager.MonitoringViews.dll”  “C:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager\WebConsole\MonitoringView\bin\Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.OperationsManager.MonitoringViews-old.dll”

# Replace DLL

copy “C:\MonAdmin\Microsoft*.dll” “C:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Mana
ger\WebConsole\MonitoringView\bin”

 

# Verify

cd “D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2016\Operations Manager\WebConsole\MonitoringView \bin”

gci Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Operations*.dll

 

Sample screenshot from Windows Explorer view of Bin directory for replaced DLL – Same size, only timestamp changes July Page 4

Windows Explorer window showing DLL's
Windows Explorer window showing DLL’s

Reboot server

 

Test WebConsole functionality

Verify from SCOM Console > Administration Tab > Settings > Web

Find Console URL
Find Console URL

Example

http://16ms01/OperationsManager

 

Contact Security Team to re-scan SCOM asset(s)

 

 

References

CVE-2020-1331 https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2020-1331

 

Microsoft Support article

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4566040/prevent-javascript-injection-in-operations-manager-2016-web-console

Tenable forum post https://community.tenable.com/s/question/0D53a000074LGapCAG/plugin-137369-security-updatesfor-microsoft-system-center-operations-manager

 

Identify orphaned agent properties

Detective investigating items under a magnifying glass

 

Back again, I’m going to ‘Identify orphaned agent properties’.  For instance, does an agent still show up under Windows Computer, or more classes, like Windows Operating System?  Typically we have handled this by using Holman’s purge blog.

 

 

 

Deleting and Purging data from the SCOM Database

 

 

First, my thanks to Kevin H, Mihai S from the SCOM PG, & Premier Support CSS, for their help.  Let’s begin the ‘Identify orphaned agent properties’ discussion with ‘how’.  First, how do you get an orphaned property?  Second, how to you resolve?

 

Some example scenarios

    1. Server rebuilt with same name.  New agent runs discovery, and creates new set of GUID’s in the database.
    2. The Monitoring Tab > Windows Computer view contains unhealthy <gray> server objects.  Upon further inspection, the server does NOT show up in the Administration > Agent Managed view.
    3. Custom management pack authoring extends the Windows Computer class, or others (via SDK or PowerShell)

 

‘Identify and resolve’ orphaned agent properties

 

    1. Check for COMMIT or Overrides in management packs

PG recommended looking at Windows Computer extended class properties, and Connector Framework discoveries.

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData.Commit()

or

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData.Override()

 

Search for the ConnectorFramework

Search management packs (MP) via SCOM OpsDB (OperationsManager Database)

    1. Login to your SCOM OpsDB > New Query

select MPName, convert(xml, MPXML)

from ManagementPack

where

   MPXML like ‘%Commit(%’ or

   MPXML like ‘%Override(%’

Export management pack output or snag it/snippet screenshot

Example Snapshot from SQL query

SQL Query output of Management Pack output with Commit or Override
SQL query of MP Commit or Override pack matches

FYI – mgmt packs above use %Commit(%, but not the connectorFramework

 

Correct discoveries that use ConnectorFramework

Replace Discoveries

Update discoveries that contain:

New-Object Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData.Commit()

New-Object Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData.Override()

Replace with:

New-Object -comObject MOM.ScriptAPI for discovery

 

Test discoveries that use Remove method

Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData.Remove()

 

 

 

Example management pack discovery script

Contains

$discovery = New-Object Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.ConnectorFramework.IncrementalDiscoveryData

$discovery.RemoveInternal($Instance,$ClassInstance.GetClasses()[0])

$discovery.Commit($mg)  <– This is the offender that causes the orphans

}

 

Don’t forget python as pre-req for agent install

Grocery List, items to get and notes
Grocery List

 

Hey guys, don’t forget python as pre-req for agent install!  Came across this again, where the docs site doesn’t mention python-ctypes as pre-req for agent install.  Let’s flip to GitHub for the agent.  GitHub lists the python pre-req here.  Otherwise, it’s Openssl 1.1.0 is only supported on x86_64 platforms (64-bit).

 

 

Let’s begin by starting with a Linux server.  I’ve used Ubuntu in my lab, specifically, Ubuntu v16.04.

Login and check if you have latest, or have the package installed (Debian Linux)

Regular user run   ‘sudo apt-get install python-ctypes

Super user/root     ‘apt-get install python-ctypes

 

screen capture of python install

 

As of 1 July, v1.13.7.0 is current (latest) 64 bit OMS for Linux agent released.

 

 

 

 

 

References

GitHub link https://github.com/Microsoft/OMS-Agent-for-Linux

GitHub Agent Download (AzMon/ALA/OMS/SCOM agent for Linux ) https://github.com/microsoft/OMS-Agent-for-Linux/releases/download/OMSAgent_v1.13.7-0/omsagent-1.13.7-0.universal.x64.sh

Python requirements https://github.com/Microsoft/OMS-Agent-for-Linux#python-requrements

Install guide https://github.com/Microsoft/OMS-Agent-for-Linux#azure-install-guide