Caution using Tags/Notes extending classes

Caution
Caution

 

Please take ‘caution using Tags/Notes extending classes’.  Please read below if you use Tags/Notes on SCOM classes.  Ran across examples where SCOM Class Properties were used for tags that used the .Notes field on various classes, causing orphaned properties, NOT removed from OperationsManager database.

 

 

Background

The Microsoft.Windows.Computer Class (insert class here) is updated using Tim McFadden’s blog.  This can cause issues with orphaned classes in the database because it is not currently handled as part of the stored procedure (i.e. the Notes property classes do not get marked for deletion).

 

First, identify which classes have Notes property.  Start from Management Server (MS) via PowerShell.   See attached TXT for additional examples to check and add/remove Notes Property on additional windows classes.

 

 

Set Notes property for Windows Operating System server

Second, we need to see how to set and clear the value, in order to clean up the Operations Manager database, to remove the orphaned instances.  The example below sets the value for one (1) server to ‘Production’.

 

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = “Production”

$WOS.Overwrite()

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

 

 

Example Output

PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = “Production”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.Overwrite()
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

PropertyAccessRights : Unknown
Parent : Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Standard
Type : Notes
Value : Production
Id : 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
ManagementGroup : SCOM2016
ManagementGroupId : e39f5f53-9fbb-9d7f-4bfe-5f0324630ae5

 

 

Set Notes property to NULL

$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’.Value = $null
$WOS.Overwrite()

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”

Verify Notes value

$WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
$WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

 

 

Example Output
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS = Get-SCOMClass -name Microsoft.Windows.OperatingSystem | get-SCOMClassInstance | where-object -property Path -eq “16db01.testlab.net”
PS C:\Users\scomadmin> $WOS.'[System.ConfigItem].Notes’

PropertyAccessRights : Unknown
Parent : Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Standard
Type : Notes
Value : (null)
Id : 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
ManagementGroup : SCOM2016
ManagementGroupId : e39f5f53-9fbb-9d7f-4bfe-5f0324630ae5

 

Have a happy Holiday!

Good luck, hopefully this scenario isn’t something that impacted the monitoring environment!

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